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Search Results 0 to 41 of about 42 (some duplicates have been removed)
so well. they tend to lose seats historically, but i think -- >> clinton didn't. >> i think there are exceptions. what barack obama is counting on is a combination of sort of wearing down the republican party. there is a sense of demoralization on the right, and if you can tamp down that turnout because essentially you're throwing so many issues at the republican base -- >> yeah. >> they almost can't resist it, and at the same time you're hiking up the excitement and keeping the level of excitement among minority voters high. i think the stuff they're doing on immigration is in part designed to do both of those things at once. >> unpack that bag. what does his throwing out that thing, whoever threw it out, his plan on immigration reform, how does that bring out, spook out, whatever you want to call it, the republican right so they make exactly the presentation he wants them to make so the hispanics, for example, will say i'm not joining that party? >> they did it to themselves. look at the reflexive reaction of a marco rubio, of leaders in that party. the reflexive reaction
, george h.w. bush, and little billy clinton. >> i don't think mark liked the speech. >> let's try to be slightly dispassionate about it. [laughter] you have a whole host of problems in society. the liberal answer is to find it a government program that will fix id. state of the union address. the conservative approach is in what way is the government passed a regulation and taxation and corruptions and hindrances of all kinds holding back to this incredible engine of the private sector, which historically has provided unpresident -- unprecedented prosperity and liberty in america? that is the difference between the parties. rubio, if you look at the transcript -- i will not speak about the delivery. it was hot in there and he was obviously thursday. [laughter] the transcript was an excellent explanation of the conservative argument that what is coming america is a sclerotic, obsolete hanging onto every regulation, every increase in taxation, i thought he did it well. the problem is, he should have done it in a studio somewhere well-prepared. >> colby? >> it was a "saturday night l
formidable. can you win back the white house of hillary clinton is a nominee? >> sure. she is formidable, -- >> she is popular. >> whoever is the nominee would have to make the case of, do we want policies of the past or something fresh? >> that is the message. >> if you like, do not stop thinking about tomorrow is when bill clinton was talking about with fleetwood mac. maybe it is time to put somebody new in. >> folder you today? >> i am 45. >> you will be 47. hillary clinton will be about 70 years old. big difference. >> bobby jindal is in his 40's. a great speech last month from kissinger who can still look for a great punchline. we were so impressed. i said to the person sitting next to me, he realized that bobby jindal and i combined are still younger and henry kissinger. >> one thing i was struck by during the campaign, governor romney was a transitional figure between an older generation, baby boomers generation and the 40 somethings. they increasingly dominate gop politics. one of those figures as paul ryan. you talk to him a lot. is his future in the house or do you think he wan
the sudden they change the topic to something wildly off topic. talking about fiscal clinton subtly you get electron why you hate gay people and not only do you hate gay people but here is a letter signed an stamp from ronald reagan showing that you hate gay people and you have never seen it before and don't know what they're talking about. this is completely random information. what are you saying? the answer to that is not pretend -- the initial reaction is i know what you are talking about. the human response, to the ego, i know what you are talking about, why do we deal with this? i don't know what you're talking about and if you want to talk about it, let me do the research first and we can have an educated debate from the issue. i don't discuss things i don't know about. it take off of the table immediately and if it doesn't take off of the table and they continue to press forward they look like a bully because it is the bullying tactic. you don't ask people to talk about things they don't know about. you don't ask a seventh grader to do calculus unless they are a genius at it and you
years. if you look at the electorate when bill clinton got elected, and ronald reagan got elected, they use this to bring up their base and maximize their vote. they use the far right to do it. >> well, it used to be -- >> since there's not enough of them. >> for every african-american vote, or latino vote is probably a better point, you would lose a vote in the southwest but that's not exactly happening. the white vote has been up a bit for obama and african-american and other minority votes zoomed. >> they lost the cities. losing more educated white voters along with minority voters and part of the problem is them. the messaging they use for their base turns off obviously younger people. turns off women. turns off minorities and this time they really got minorities excited about voting. when you do things to prevent people from voting, that made that vote solidify and come out and visit in 2008. >> this is the problem they have. the leadership, michael gerschwins of the world, they alienate the people who vote for the party. >> angry guy in arizona. >> john mccain, town hall mee
. but what i can say is when i was offered this job by secretary clinton, the office had lost a competence of key players on capitol hill and others in the u.s. government. so i just produce a chance to start over anything probably a lot of what we are doing with the original conception. and i'm trying not to throw out the baby with the bathwater. probably nobody has said that since her grandmother died. so my feeling is they think the original intent was to be strategic and to have a policy influence. and then i think when it went through its middle stages a coordinator and never gain traction in the state department. so it then went into a kind of supplier of people, which i thought was too limited. so we've tried to recapture that want to be part of the conversation. we've been very fortunate to have the support for secretary clinton for the first year of our existing and now what we are finding that only been in a handful of meetings with secretary kerry, but in every one of the meanings, he has said, or bring the ideas. give me some out-of-the-box thinking. we've got to find another w
that for the republican primaries, like santorum, he was much more in sync with that than senator clinton was. obviously senator santorum did not have the formidable apparatus that hillary clinton had. >> do you think that it had -- >> what do we know about the republican party? what do we know about mitt romney? [laughter] >> i think that is a testament. he did not begin this with a national or geographical or ideological base. in those debates, through skill, he took positions that people disagreed with like healthcare, but he given is the republican party that he had the qualities that he wanted to be the nominee. >> every week it was the new whack a mole. we went from perry to gingrich. >> herman cain was next. >> and then he blew up at the bloomberg debates. who were these? who were they? it seems like it was the same percentage of the electorate. >> governor perry was formidable. senator santorum -- anyone who underestimates him -- so much of running for president, the guys and gals who work the hardest -- senator santorum has the work ethic. >> the minute you say that, oh, that is right. [laught
santorum was much more in sync with the base then senator clinton was with the democratic party base. she was a pro-work candidate in an inside or party -- a pro-war candidate in an anti-war party. >> what you think it santorum had had perry's early money? >> what we know about the republican party? what we know about mitt romney? >> moderate mormon from massachusetts, right? >> i think it is a testament to his political skills that he did not begin with a natural geographical or ideological base. but he was able to shift political skill to taking positions that in many cases people disagree with. like health care. but to convince the republican party he had the qualities that they wanted to be his nominee. >> it is pretty dicey where every week there was a new w hack-a-mole conservative challenger. we went from rick perry to herman cain, and then there was that moment where he blew up at the bloomberg debate. who were these voters? not who were they -- but it started with trump and michele bachmann. it seemed like it was the same 20% of the electorate. >> i just want to add, you know, go
and influential senator, a republican icon who voted to impeach president clinton over the lewinsky scandal. >> mr. domenici, guilty. >> he says truthfulness is the first pillar of a good character. >> i think there's an element of hypocrisy, no question. >> reporter: matt cooper says that now because we're finding out while domenici was blasting bill clinton, he was hiding from everyone, including his own family, that he fathered a child out of wedlock several years early and with the daughter of another republican legend, former republican senator paul laxalt. pete domenici has said that he's aware of this for several months. my past action has caused hurt and disappointment to my wife, children, family, and others. i deeply regret this and am very sorry for my behavior. >> what do you make about the revelation and the timing so many years later? >> it seems like someone forced their hands. someone was going to write about it. so they thought they would come out and be forthright about it. >> indeed, michelle laxalt says, recently information has come to me that this sacred situation might be tw
for bill clinton. so, we will start with the president. benghazi. campaign stuff. gentleman, what do you say? >> it is not campaign stuff. that was four months ago. we are in february and repeatedly learning more things because of the confirmation hearings. the republicans are doing a good job forcing the white house to answer more questions. although we have a lot more to learn. >> i was surprised and struck by the president's statement about benghazi. i know he wants to move forward. >> that was a stunning statement. i have never quite seen something like that, it reminds me of nixon and watergate. something is going on, when john mccain used the word "coverup" woodward was on with chris wallace and he said a lot of these are legitimate questions. we don't know...no one knows from the evacuees interviewed by the f.b.i., we don't know what the president was doing. there are four dead americans and what is happening, it is getting more and more the case that this is developing --. >> why would he even go from, doug? >> he raised the issue. >> here is what he is trying to do. he is trying
-state landslide but claimed 119 counties. bill clinton won with 1,524 counties. do you know how many counties obama won last year? 690. that's it. 690. even though he won a convincing popular vote majority. gerrymandering wasn't a complete nonfactor in 2012. the gop probably did grab a few extra seats because of it. but the real problem for democrats is that their base of support is less spread out geographically than it's ever been, which means they can win presidential races and even control the senate, but when it comes to the house, their best, their only chance for the foreseeable future is a massive anti-gop tide, like something we saw in 2006 or 2008. short of that, the era of republican speakers could last for a long time. okay, that does it for "the cycle." martin bashir, it's all yours. >> thank you and good afternoon. it's wednesday, february the 20th. if at first you can't succeed, just call him a socialist. >> sequester scare. >> sequester looming. >> 700,000 civilian employees could be furloughed. >> this is all b.s. >> this is not an an traction. people will lose their
in a hypothetical matchup with clinton. so i think while he's got some making up to do, i think with the grassroots among republicans, ultimately i think he's in good standing because ultimately i think people will think he'd make a pretty good national candidate. >> let's stipulate, though, that mitt romney was not up against exactly stellar group of candidates to claim that mantle and they stretched it out and really wanted an alternative. but chris christie also much more skilled politician than mitt romney. >> john, christie's popularity has not worn very well with the great glenn beck. listen to him mope with the chris christie that he used to know on bill o'reilly. here he comes. >> i feel about rand paul about the way i used to feel about chris christie. i thought chris christie was really good and i ignored a few things that kind of bothered me. but now i don't like chris christie. >> in-depth analysis there. >> but can republicans -- are they smart enough to draw a line between a 74% approval rating and glenn beck's sdis approval? >> i mean that's assuming that glenn beck still has the sam
clinton was. obviously senator santorum did not have the formidable apparatus that hillary clinton had. >> do you think that it had -- >> what do we know about the republican party? what do we know about mitt romney? [laughter] >> i think that is a testament. he did not begin this with a national or geographical or ideological base. in those debates, through skill , he took positions that people disagreed with like healthcare, but he given is the republican party that he had the qualities that he wanted to be the nominee. >> every week it was the new whack a mole. .e went from perry to gingrich >> herman cain was next. >> and then he blew up at the bloomberg debates. who were these? where they? -- who were they? it seems like it was the same percentage of the electorate. >> governor perry was formidable. senator santorum -- anyone who underestimates him --so much of running for president, the guys and gal to work the hardest -- senator santorum have the work ethic. plen>> the minute you say that,, that is right. [laughter] >> thank you. if we are going head to head, he could take away
primary vote was more in sync than senator clinton was for the democratic party base, and she obviously senator santorum didn't have the formidable apparatus, he didn't have the body weight -- >> do you think if santorum had had perry's early money it's a different -- >> well, i think it's -- what do we know about the republican party? it's increasingly evangelical, southern and populist. what do we know about mitt romney? [laughter] i think that is a testament to his political skill, that he didn't begin this with a natural, geographical or ideological base. and yet he was able particularly in those debates through, i think, sheer political skill to -- taking positions that in many cases people disagreed with. like health care. but to convince the republican party that he had the qualities that they wanted to be their nominee. >> what would you gees seeing in your -- you gees seeing in your debates where every year it was the new whack-a-mole, conservative challenger. so we went from perry to herman cain next? herman cain was next, right? in that sort of moment, and then he blew up at
was in the majority party. speaker gingrich was the speaker. he worked with then-president bill clinton. we balanced the budget five of those fourteen years. it meant that there was compromise. this requires compromise. this requires republicans stepping forward with some ideas about how to keep essential services of government running at the level that people have been accustomed to. this is not rocket science. this is people coming together the way that other congresses have done to solve big issues. i suggest that my former colleagues on the republican side go see the movie "lincoln," because in the movie "lincoln," it shows how hard it was back then to get things done. but what lincoln did is he gathered people around him the way that i believe president obama is doing by calling republicans, talking to them, trying to work with them. and when that happens, big things get solved. the fiscal cliff got solved because people started talking to one another. so this can happen again. yes, ma'am. >> yes, have your phones been ringing from members of the public? and if so, what are they saying? >> i'm
. each of us on either side of president clinton as he announced the once unthinkable normalization of our relations with vietnam, and efforts that john mccain and i worked on for about 10 years to try do. in the last decade, thanks in large part to the work of usaid, our exports to vietnam increased by more than 700%. every one of those percentage points our jobs here in america. in the last two decades, 1000 vietnamese students and scholars have studied spanish and taught -- have studied and taught in america through the fulbright program, including the foreign minister, who i just talked to the other day and who has feelings about america because of that engagement. the list goes on. as the emerging middle class in india, the world's largest democracy, buys our products, that means jobs and incomes for our own middle-class. as our traditional assistance to brazil and decreases, trade there is increasing. brazil is one of the new tigers moving at a double-digit pace. it supports additional jobs here at home, many in the u.s. travel and tourism industry. when jefferson expanded our
to anything like that but it is was remarkable that he was one of the 4,000 a day according to the clinton justice department that do use a firearm in self-defense. obviously, he is pretty happy he was able to do so. >> next call comes from alabama. caller: good morning, sir. i'm a first time caller. appreciate c-span. my comments or issues are is that the majority of these people are talking about second amendment rights. they have to realize that the second amendment was written years and years ago. things do get amended. the people who we put there to control these laws, they are being controlled by lobbyists, the n.r.a. ena other groups also. let's see if we can contribute to these congressman and other people, who is going to protect us instead of doing what they want to do. guest: well, i think the caller is making an argument that is frequently made by people who have questions about the second amendment. yeah, the second amendment was written in the 18th century. so was the first amendment. yes, many years have gone by and firearms have developmented, technology has changed but we
primary dollars. >> you guys had the luxury near primary were you had these clinton donors who have never given money. and suddenly they could max out to you for the first time. >> the biggest difference is they had someone who is not going to take further financing versus mccain who was a setback if you need the ability to write unlimited money. >> which are primary site -- there is nobody who had a fundraising list. is that fair to say, not? >> there were some. >> so our theories are in the spirit that i know these guys made the decision to spend money early. that's the power of the comments. so during the period where we face this challenge, we did a few things and so we used the money we are raising and big chunks and high bar indeed be independent expenditure, which that probably occurred to me that timetable up. the other thing going on were super pacs and at that moment would be a lot of super pac activity. but we needed the super pacs and also during the period, the governor signed off on a $20 million love that allowed us to use primary money to pay back the general money. and so
. and what bill clinton and the democratic party discovered when the issue was working in their favor in the 1990s is there is lots of constituents in the country who don't feel that way about guns. certain things on the ground have changed. the democratic party have changed be. uin some ways, they're recovering lost knowledge from a previous generation of democrats that actually did know this back in the mid 1990s. >> do you think they're also recognizing that it's not just the median gun owner in oklahoma, doesn't represent the country as a whole, but also the -- the statements of the national rifle association. >> absolutely. >> do not even represent the beliefs of the standard national rifle association member. i mean there is also -- >> yep. >> this dysmorphia between who speaks on the issue and who has strong feelings about the iraq. >> i am now forever going to conjure the image of wayne lapierre when i hear the word dysmorphia. that actually has gotten worse. one of the perverse consequences of republican conservative victory guns is that the nra increasingly has had to justif
to impeople president clinton, lindsey graham unlike hagel has never seen combat, correct? >> that would be correct. >> john: what is the state of the g.o.p. in south carolina? if an elected representative shows a glimmer of moderation, are they facing a primary? >> they are. we have a very active and very aggressive tea party very conservative very, very conservative tea party effort here and so it is driven moderate the out of the republican party. that's been good for the democratic party because we believe, for instance, in the upcoming special election that the voters of the first congressional district who traditionally vote republican will elect elizabeth colbert-bush as their congresswoman instead of disgraced former governor mark sanford. >> john: i'm glad you brought that race up. i think that specific race in south carolina for my money will be the congressional race to watch in 2014. of course, we're talking about the first congressional district which opened up when tim scott was named senator replaced jim demint who went off to be a lobbyist. it is an interesting cast of ch
deadbeat dad's provision of president clinton's 1996 welfare reform act that brings me to the third point. the extent policymakers want stable families in racialized families they could conform the policies. the war on drugs. the aggressive incourse ration of young, minority men and the rule that is bar them from voting, living in public housing, securing educational loans or finding work long after they served their time. it's largely implicated in the fabric of the liberal families. closing the gab between how things are and how we wish they could be means taking a serious and focused approach to addressing joblessness, income, education and sentencing practice that is keep black and latino men in and out of prison. i hear president obama. and those of you who are calling for personal responsibility and a desire for absentee fathers to step up to the plate. sure. i mean it's a deeply, human, personal reaction. i get it. but here, we are talking about policy. let's be honest, a woman can do everything right, get an education, marry before having children and can still end up a single mom
noise ! give it up for maria cardona, senior adviser from hillary clinton's 2008 campaign. she's on cnn. give it up for maria cardona. ♪ >> gracias. buenos tardes. allso happy to be here with of you at this historic event. this is a way to stand up for climate change. thank you to 350.org, nrdc, and teh sierra club, and all of you making this powerful rally possible. for our children, our future, we must do more for climate change. just a few short years ago, the environmental issues did not really register with latinos as a constant concern. times have changed and that has changed. that has changed, sadly, because we have seen the detrimental effect of toxins in our air and water and what it does to our families and their children. unfortunately, latino communities, families, and all the communities in this country are suffering from this. they may not disproportionately live in communities where their air and water have been poisoned, our children have as much. we live. we breathe, we play in these places that have been poisoned by these toxins. to the president's statement, we do n
Search Results 0 to 41 of about 42 (some duplicates have been removed)